December 2021

Process Controls, Instrumentation and Automation

How one analyzer technology can improve a semi-regenerative catalytic reforming process

Going back to the earliest days of the industry, oil refiners have found that breaking down crude oil into marketable fractions does not always result in high volumes of the most profitable products.

Garza, A., Endress+Hauser

Going back to the earliest days of the industry, oil refiners have found that breaking down crude oil into marketable fractions does not always result in high volumes of the most profitable products. For example, conventional thermal cracking may create far more naphtha and high-molecular weight fractions than can be sold, while leaving demand for more profitable high-octane gasoline blending components unfilled. As a result, petroleum chemists and process designers have created numerous catalyst-based methods for producing more desirable fractions initially—combined with converting low-value products into higher-value reformates—by using techniques such as: Fluid catalytic cracking Alky

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